Reserve Sightings

Kingfisher - Nick Townell - resized & copyright
Kingfisher on Salt Pans perch (c) Nick Townell

At this time of year the Pink-footed Geese aren’t the only birds that we keep our eyes (and ears) peeled for. We also regularly watch a perch located in the Salt Pans directly in front of the Visitor Centre and if you’ve been watching that this week you won’t have been disappointed – the Kingfisher was spotted there on the 31st August, and the 2nd, 3rd, and 5th of September.

Another bird we get to see a little more often as winter comes around is the Teal and so far 2 females and 2 eclipse males were seen in the Salt Pans on the 5th. Another, slightly unusual, sighting for the Visitor Centre was the immature Little Grebe spotted just in front of the viewing windows. While Little Grebes are more regularly seen at Old Montrose Pier, with 8 sighted there on the 31st, we wouldn’t normally expect to see them on the east side of the Basin.

Other sightings this week have been 15 Golden Plover, 14 Knot, 350 Lapwings, and 28 Goldeneye throughout the Basin. 3 Tree Pipets were seen by the Bridge of Dun and 3 Linnets in front of the Visitor Centre. Grey Herons remain a continuing presence at the Salt Pans, with 22 seen on the 1st, as do the 2 Moorhen who make a daily appearance and 10 Goosanders regularly seen ‘fishing’ close to the Visitor Centre around mid-tide. On the predator side, a Sparrowhawk was staking-out the bird feeders on the 1st and a Stoat was spotted near the dipping pond on the same day. While Canada Geese can still be seen at the Basin, with 30 counted on the 31st, we are yet to have any further sightings of Pink-footed Geese.

Georgina Bowie, Visitor Centre Assistant

 

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Preface

At this time of year the Pink-footed Geese aren’t the only birds that we keep our eyes (and ears) peeled for. We also regularly watch a perch located in the …

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