Our four visitor centres provide incredible wildlife and educational experiences to tens of thousands of people each year.

If you’re looking for a wild day out with all the family, why not visit one of our four visitor centres?

Each has something different to offer, from nesting ospreys at Loch of the Lowes to Jupiter’s urban oasis in the heart of industrial Grangemouth. Find out more about each of the visitor centres below.

Loch of the Lowes

Embraced by mature woodland in a picturesque glen, this tranquil loch has been owned by the Trust since 1969. Three waterside Hides provide excellent opportunities to view great crested grebe, goldeneye, wigeon and (March-September) spectacular breeding ospreys in their eyrie, just 150m away.

Inside the family friendly visitor centre, browse the shop, find information on wildlife and climate change and have a cup of coffee while enjoying close-up views of red squirrels, great spotted woodpecker, nuthatch and many more species of woodland birds.

Montrose Basin

A bird haven situated in the heart of Angus on the edge of a tidal estuary, the Basin is of international importance for over 100,000 migratory birds each year.

Tens of thousands of pink-footed geese can be seen on the reserve in Autumn, and the visitor centre telescopes are set up perfectly for watching a huge diversity of wildlife, including common seals, kingfisher, and osprey.

Falls of Clyde

Situated in the historic village of New Lanark, the Falls of Clyde have provided inspiration for artists including Turner and Wordsworth.

As well as stunning waterfalls and woodland on offer, the reserve is home to badgers, bats and in some years, nesting peregrine falcons.

Jupiter Urban Wildlife Centre

It’s easy to forget you’re in the heart of Grangemouth when visiting this urban wildlife haven. A true environmental success story, this once barren wasteland is now a green oasis.

Jupiter is a great place to see birds, butterflies and dragonflies and you can even try your hand at pond dipping!

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