Too Fat To Fly

Juvenile Gannet (c) Andy Wakelin

On Saturday (22/09/12) a juvenile gannet was spotted in the field next to the visitor centre. Juvenile gannets have a very different plumage from the adults, being predominantly black, with white speckles, mainly on the head and neck. The gannet seemed unable to take off and get back into the air, however, this is perfectly normal for juvenile gannets. They are so fat and heavy when they fledge from their cliff-top nests that they are too heavy to fly and, therefore, just live on the surface of the water, starving themselves until they are light enough to take to the air. So hopefully with a few more days of dieting and the helping hand off this week’s strong winds, our visitor will soon be up in the air!

Since our great count of 63,844 pink footed geese last week, the numbers don’t seem to have increased any further, although we would expect them to in the next few weeks.  So why not come along bright and early to the basin next Sunday and see the spectacle……

Sunday 7th October, 6.30am – 9.30am: People’s Postcode Lottery Goose Breakfast

Then it’s back to the Visitor Centre for porridge and toast, with an optional presentation by the ranger to follow.  Wear warm clothing. £8 per person.  Booking is essential.

Craig Shepherd

Visitor Centre Assistant Manager

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Preface

On Saturday (22/09/12) a juvenile gannet was spotted in the field next to the visitor centre. Juvenile gannets have a very different plumage from the adults, being predominantly black, with …

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