Wildlife Blog 9th April 2011

Good afternoon all,

Events from the nest today:

It has been a somewhat routine day for our pair of opreys, with the male bringing in fish this morning for our female to keep her strength up. This is a very important job as a regular intake of protein is necessary for her to produce healthy eggs, something which we are all hoping for!

Later this morning the male visited the nest twice bringing in the occasional stick to add to the nest. Though his most important job is to bring in food for the female, this is also useful as she can remain on the nest and continue create the nest bowl where the eggs will be laid.

Around lunchtime the male attempted to mate with our female but was not entirely successful. This may be a sign that the eggs are already developing and she is refusing his advances because of this.

 At 2:45pm this afternoon the male returned to the nest again. This time he brought a gift of a fish with him which the female accepted gratefully. She appeared relieved that he had resumed his duties as chief hunter gatherer!

Other Wildlife at Loch of the Lowes:

It has been a particularly eventful day for other visitors to the reserve. The highlights were most definitely the three goosander that were seen on the loch. These distinctive and highly attractive birds are members of the saw-tooth family that have specially adapted bills that aid in catching and holding slippery fish. They are excellent divers and are agile enough in the water too catch small fish.

Thanks to a camera we have placed inside one of our nest boxes, we have been able to observe a blue tit bringing in nest material and beginning to sculpt it. This material largely consists of moss which is soft and warm, providing the ideal surface on which to incubate eggs.

Other species of note were great crested grebes, mute swans, tufted ducks and a massive count of 47 goldeneye. Two great spotted woodpeckers were seen at the feeders, along with four greenfinches, a siskin, a reed bunting and a yellowhammer. A treecreeper was also seen hopping around a nearby trunk. 

Simon 

Perthshire Reserves Trainee Ranger

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Preface

Good afternoon all, Events from the nest today: It has been a somewhat routine day for our pair of opreys, with the male bringing in fish this morning for our …

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