Fairy flower

Campanula rotundifolia is most commonly referred to as the Scottish bluebell or harebell.

These flowers are a favourite with many people and deservedly so. Their delicate papery flowers nod happily in a breeze. They are often found in large clumps, adding a lovely splash of light blue to a meadow or woodland.

The delicate flower of the harebell © Rhian Davies

As they flower from July to September, they are out long after many of our wildflowers so really make an impact. They also provide a late source of nectar for bees.

But it’s not just the wildlife and people that enjoy harebells. Fairy folk and witches are strongly associated with these flowers in folklore. A patch of harebells is a favourite home for fairies and if one is to walk through such a clump, the fairies cast spells on the perpetrator, giving this flower the names of Dead Man’s Bells and Fairies’ thimbles.

A harebell patch, or maybe a fairy village © Rhian Davies

It was a strong belief that witches could turn in to hares to avoid detection. Many believed this flower was used in the spell to transform them. Others thought the juice of a crushed flower was used in the spell to make them fly.

Bye for now,

Rhian (Seasonal Ranger)

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Preface

Campanula rotundifolia is most commonly referred to as the Scottish bluebell or harebell. These flowers are a favourite with many people and deservedly so. Their delicate papery flowers nod happily …

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