The sound of dinner

Another close encounter with the juvenile peregrines gave me the opportunity to find out what the sound of a bird being eaten sounds like!

Although slightly gruesome it was fascinating and I doubt there are many places in the country where such an up close view of a peregrine tucking in to dinner can be seen.

Dinner time © Rhian Davies

One of the adults had dropped off the prey (probably a starling) on to a tree stump in front of the watch site. The juvenile was hot on the tail of the adult bird and landed on the stump and began tearing the prey apart. I was sat only metres away so could hear the feathers being ripped out of the unfortunate starling.

The juveniles won’t make their first kill for another few weeks, so are still reliant on their parents for food. They will follow them out on hunts to watch the adults and pick up some tips for when they have to fend for themselves.

It won’t be long until the watch site closes down and the peregrines will be spending more time away, so a visit now could reward you with some close encounters.

Rhian – Seasonal Ranger

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Preface

Another close encounter with the juvenile peregrines gave me the opportunity to find out what the sound of a bird being eaten sounds like! Although slightly gruesome it was fascinating …

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