State of Nature report reveals worrying decline in Scotland’s wildlife

The most comprehensive State of Nature report ever produced has confirmed that Scotland’s wildlife continues to decline.

Oak Tree in Roslin Glen
Oak Tree in Roslin Glen © Katrina Martin

The latest findings in the report, published by more than 70 wildlife organisations including the Scottish Wildlife Trust, demonstrate worrying trends including a 49% decline in the studied species in Scotland. One in nine species, including kittiwakes and wildcats, are threatened with extinction. The report is the clearest picture to date of the status of species across land and sea.

The report is based on invaluable data gathered by thousands of volunteers. It demonstrates that the abundance and distribution of Scotland’s species has declined over recent decades. Most measures indicate that this decline has continued in the last ten years.

“We cannot afford for these trends to continue, particularly in a climate emergency.”

Jo Pike, Chief Executive

Our Chief Executive Jo Pike said: “This report clearly sets out the grave threats to Scotland’s wildlife. Nearly half of the country’s species have declined, and one in nine are threatened with extinction.

However, while time is running out to reverse biodiversity loss we must also recognise that positive action is possible. Thousands of people and organisations – from volunteers and community groups to farmers, land managers, businesses and many others – are already working across Scotland to make a difference.

“To reverse the loss of biodiversity and address climate change it is vital that we increase our investment in nature. This means taking urgent, strategic action to protect and restore natural habitats on land and sea, green our towns and cities, and transform our relationship with the natural world. Nature is our life support system, we owe it to future generations to support its recovery.”

Lead author Paul Walton added: “This report draws on the best available data on Scotland’s biodiversity, produced by partnerships between conservation NGOs, research institutes, government and agencies, and thousands of dedicated volunteers.

“Scotland is uniquely placed to set a global example in responding to the twin climate and ecological crises. We must see a step change in how we resource the conservation of all our biodiversity and develop nature-based approaches to climate change. If we do so, we can lead the way towards the transformative change that nature demands.”

The report has a foreword by a collective of young conservationists who are passionate about conservation and the future of our wildlife and nature to preserve it for future generations.

Young conservationist Dan Rouse said: “Nature is something that shaped my childhood, that allowed me to be free to use my sense of wonder, and to gain an insight into the wonderful world of nature! It’s young people that are now picking up the baton to save our nature – we’ve already lost Corn Buntings and Nightingales in Wales – how long until they’re gone from the rest of the UK? Along with the eerie calls of curlew and the gentle purr of the turtle doves.”

Read more 

Read the 2019 State of Nature Scotland Report (pdf)

Find out about our Nature’s Emergency Service campaign 

Help protect Scotland’s wildlife

Our work to save Scotland’s wildlife is made possible thanks to the generosity of our members and supporters.

Join today from just £3 a month to help protect the species you love.

Join today


Preface

The most comprehensive State of Nature report ever produced has confirmed that Scotland’s wildlife continues to decline. The latest findings in the report, published by more than 70 wildlife organisations …

Posted in

News - ,

Stay up to date with the Scottish Wildlife Trust by subscribing to our mailing list 

Back to top