Funding to help improve Cumbernauld Glen Wildlife Reserve

The Scottish Wildlife Trust’s Cumbernauld Glen Wildlife Reserve will be made a better place for people and wildlife thanks to funding provided by WREN.

A grant of £86,796 will be used to thin non-native woodland and control invasive species, plant native trees and hedgerows, and create new wildlife habitats.

Reserve Manager Duncan Clark said: “This welcome funding from WREN will help us continue our long term plan to increase the amount of native woodland within Cumbernauld. Creating new habitats for wildlife and controlling non-native species will make the reserve a better place for wildlife, and in turn make it a more interesting place for people to visit.”

Cumbernauld Glen © Katrina Martin
Cumbernauld Glen © Katrina Martin

WREN’s Grant Manager for Scotland, Sophie Cade said: “WREN has a long history of supporting wildlife and habitat conservation in Cumbernauld, and we’re really pleased to be able to continue to be a part of this important work.”

Thanks to the funding from WREN fifteen hectares of non-native woodland will be selectively thinned and more than 4,000 native trees will be planted in woods and hedgerows. A number of small ponds will be created, perches posts for birds of prey will be installed, and new wildflower meadows will be sown in gaps in the woodland.

Work will also take place to control the spread of the non-native invasive species including Himalayan balsam, Japanese knotweed and rhododendron ponticum.

Cumbernauld Glen’s ancient woodland is a haven for wildlife and as well as a popular and relaxing attraction for local people. Early spring sees pockets of snowdrops appearing, summer brings a profusion of bluebells and pine martens may be active during the day.

Preface

The Scottish Wildlife Trust’s Cumbernauld Glen Wildlife Reserve will be made a better place for people and wildlife thanks to funding provided by WREN. A grant of £86,796 will be …

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