Burn off Christmas calories on a Trust reserves

The Trust is encouraging people to burn off the extra Christmas calories by visiting any of it 120 reserves across Scotland.

The Trust’s reserves cover more than 20,000 hectares, with 90% of the Scottish population living within 10 miles of at least one reserve.

According to recent research, people in the UK consume around 7,000 calories on average on Christmas Day. The recommended daily intake for a man is 2,500 and for a woman 2,000, meaning that most people will consume more than double the amount of food that they need.

Walking is a great, low-impact form of cardiovascular exercise, with the average person burning up to 250 calories per hour, and perfect for working off holiday overindulgence.

Director of Conservation, Simon Jones, said: “The Scottish Wildlife Trust is encouraging people to get outside and enjoy our wildlife reserves during the holiday period.

“Walking is a fantastic form of exercise and our reserves offer some great walks where people can see all types of wildlife, especially birds, all through the winter. Some of our reserves, particularly around the Cumbernauld and Irvine areas also have excellent cycle trails and if you’re really keen to burn off the Christmas pud, then why not take a jog around a reserve?”

“This time of year can be very hectic, so getting outside for a few hours is also a great way to find some peace, relax and appreciate the special natural places which support so many of our native species and habitats”.

“The Trust would remind people to be prepared when visiting reserves and stay safe. Please wrap up warm, wear appropriate footwear and ensure that you plan for the short winter days and early sunsets.”

To find your closest Trust reserve please visit www.scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk/visit/reserves  

Preface

The Trust is encouraging people to burn off the extra Christmas calories by visiting any of it 120 reserves across Scotland. The Trust’s reserves cover more than 20,000 hectares, with 90% …

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