Walking the Kinytre Way (and a trip to Arran)

Last week I went on a little adventure to the Kintyre Peninsula, I had originally planned to walk the Kinytre Way – a 100-mile route walking through some of Kintyre’s most scenic countryside. My best-laid plans fell by the wayside after three days when I managed to injure my leg. If anyone is going to hurt themselves by just walking, it will be me.

Kintyre looking over to Gigha (c) Laura Preston
Kintyre looking over to Gigha (c) Laura Preston

After my injury I hopped (hobbled?) onto a ferry and spent a couple of days on Arran, which is such a beautiful place and only an hours drive from Hamilton. The perfect place to visit for a long weekend! It was so nice to be immersed in nature for a week, sleeping, eating and generally living outside. Being surrounded by the sights and sounds of the great outdoors was very restorative. And then it snowed – definitely time to go home at that point.

I was often accompanied, or at least it felt that way, by one of my favourite birds – the raven. I They always appeared when I was feeling tired from my walk or a bit lonely (not many people walk the Kintyre Way), then I would here the familiar ‘kronk’ of one calling overhead. I think even though I travelled to an area of Scotland that I have never been to before. Being able to identify the plants and animals around me was very comforting; it made me feel like I belonged in that landscape.

I also saw and heard all the familiar species that I regularly see here at the Falls of Clyde at this time of year – willow warblers, blackcaps and chiffchaffs are all firmly established and holding territories. And all the different wildflowers – wood anemone, lesser celandine and opposite-leaved golden saxifrage were found in abundance. I am also pretty sure I saw a golden eagle on Arran, if you needed an excuse to go; I think you’ve now found one!

Laura Preston – Scottish Wildlife Trust, Falls of Clyde Ranger
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Preface

Last week I went on a little adventure to the Kintyre Peninsula, I had originally planned to walk the Kinytre Way – a 100-mile route walking through some of Kintyre’s …

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