Tree felling works at the Falls of Clyde – UPDATE

Did you know the Forestry Commission used to own part of what is now the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve? They bought part of the Bonnington Estate in the 1950’s and planted a mix of conifer trees throughout the site to produce timber. These conifer trees often originate from North America (Douglas fir and Sitka spruce) and Europe (Norway spruce) and aren’t as good for wildlife as the native broadleaved woodland that would naturally grow here.

Non-Native Norway Maple (c) Laura Preston
Non-Native Norway Maple (c) Laura Preston

Over the last 30 years, the Scottish Wildlife Trust has slowly been reducing the amount of conifer trees in the wood to allow native trees to recolonise and the latest phase of this woodland restoration began last week with the felling of some of the conifers between Corra Linn and Bonnington Linn. More felling will take place over the coming weeks and the logs will be extracted and sold to help pay for the operation.

If you are visiting the reserve over the next few months, please follow the advice of signage on site; it is there for your safety and the safety of the contractors working here. Sometimes we may have to put diversions in place but this will only be during the week. Over weekends and holidays, all paths will be open as usual. If you have any questions about the work that is happening at the Falls of Clyde, please don’t hesitate to get in touch – 01555 665 262 or fallsofclyde@scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk.

Some work has already been carried out in certain areas and it is quite exciting to see the changes already. I was surprised at how many broadleaved trees were amongst the conifers, so although there are small gaps in the canopy there aren’t huge areas with no tree cover. This spring I am looking forward to seeing the wildflowers that have lain dormant for so long!

Laura Preston – Scottish Wildlife Trust, Falls of Clyde Ranger
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Preface

Did you know the Forestry Commission used to own part of what is now the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve? They bought part of the Bonnington Estate in the 1950’s …

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