So long, farewell?

The last couple of mornings a sound which has become very familiar to us over the last few months has been missing. KP2’s incessant calling has ceased (he hasn’t been seen or heard since Monday) and we now feel it is safe to assume that our final fledgling has departed on his maiden migration.

While the male (LM12) was still prepared to feed him, KP2 showed little inclination to do anything for himself, apart from make a lot of noise! Hopefully now that he’s on his own he’ll quickly learn to rely on his own survival abilities.

Speaking of LM12, he hasn’t been seen since yesterday morning, when he spent several hours sat on a lower branch of the silver birch tree opposite the hide, polishing off a fish – possibly his last before heading off himself? We’ll let you know if he reappears later today.

Wherever our birds choose to spend the winter we wish them all well and hope to see LM12 & LF15 back here next spring.

Our newly ringed chicks © Keith Brockie
This year’s cohort shortly after ringing © Keith Brockie

A big thank you to everyone who has visited Loch of the Lowes during this osprey season and to the many more of you who have followed our osprey family’s story online via the blog, webcam and twitter. We really appreciate your support.

The Visitor Centre remains open daily from 10am-5pm until 31st October. There’s still plenty of reasons to visit Loch of the Lowes at this time of year, with a wide variety of woodland/garden birds and red squirrels to be seen at the feeding station, waterbirds including great crested grebes and goosander on the loch and a varied programme of weekend activities for families.

Jonathan

Preface

The last couple of mornings a sound which has become very familiar to us over the last few months has been missing. KP2’s incessant calling has ceased (he hasn’t been seen …

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