The Best of the Best – National Nature Reserves

Last week our Reserves Manager led a group of rather important people around the reserve. They work for Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) looking after National Nature Reserves (NNRs). I have harped on about this before but the Falls of Clyde is part of the Clyde Valley Woodlands NNR. What is unusual about it is that it is a composite NNR – made up of multiple sites along the Clyde Valley. Another unusual thing is that CVW NNR is the only one to have a partnership with a local authority, in this case South Lanarkshire Council.

St Kilda (c) Colin Wilson
St Kilda (c) Colin Wilson

There are 47 National Nature Reserves in Scotland and they’re some of the best places for wildlife in the country.  They’re managed primarily for nature, but people are welcome too, many have facilities to enable visitors to appreciate the wildlife living there. Together, the suite of NNRs, showcase the wide variety of Scotland’s habitats and species from pine forest to blanket bog, from seabird colonies to mountain plants. They are located all over the country – the northernmost is Hermaness at the northern tip of Shetland, while Caerlaverock is at the other end of the country on the shores of the Solway Firth.

NNRs are incredible places to visit, they are the best of the best and we’re so privileged to have one on our doorstep. If you would like to visit one you can look at their website www.nnr-scotland.org.uk for more details. They have an interactive map facility so you can easily find out where they are. I bet you didn’t know that there is an NNR at Loch Lomond? It is aptly named Loch Lomond NNR, and probably one of the most well know NNRs which I and many others would love to visit is St Kilda!

 

Laura Preston – Scottish Wildlife Trust, Falls of Clyde Ranger

Preface

Last week our Reserves Manager led a group of rather important people around the reserve. They work for Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) looking after National Nature Reserves (NNRs). I have …

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