Foxy flowers

Over the last week, the foxgloves around the reserve have shot up. Where there were open green spaces there are rows of these towering purple, white and pink flowers.

Flower towers © Rhian Davies

The common name of foxglove comes from the Anglo-Saxon ‘foxes glova’. The name was given because it was thought the tubular flowers were used as gloves by small animals. Medieval herbalists also referred to the flowers as witches thimbles. No doubt they believed the cup like flowers could be used to brew potions.

Foxgloves are deadly poisonous but were used in medicine and a chemical from the plant is still used as an ingredient in heart medication.

A bees-eye view © Rhian Davies

The flowers are also an excellent source of nectar and pollen for insects.

Bye for now,

Rhian – Seasonal Ranger

Preface

Over the last week, the foxgloves around the reserve have shot up. Where there were open green spaces there are rows of these towering purple, white and pink flowers. The …

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