Ring ring!

Each year the peregrine chicks at the Falls of Clyde are ringed.

This involves collecting the chicks from the nest and fitting them with a small metal ring on each leg. One ring has a unique code on it, identifying the bird as a Falls of Clyde 2012 fledgling. The other has a chip in, like a cat or dog might have, so researches can identify the birds electronically.

Ringing is done so we can collect information on where the chicks end up when they leave the nest. Thanks to the ringing programme, we know that some of the chicks have set up home in Dumfries and Galloway.

Initially the ringing date was to be on Monday, but the date has now changed to Thursday 24th. The action should start around 4pm, with the ringer setting up his equipment to abseil down the cliff and collect the chicks.

This procedure does cause the parents some distress, but they are quite used to the process as it happens ever year. The ringing is done as quickly as possible to minimise the disturbance and the adults soon return to the site once the ringing is over.

As peregrines are a scheduled one listed species, disturbing a nest site is illegal. Ringing is allowed as long as it is carried out by a licensed ringer, as in the case of the Falls of Clyde peregrines.

The peregrine watch site will be open as normal, so people can watch the ringing. If you can’t make it down to the Falls of Clyde, then you can always follow the action on the webcam!

See you soon,

Rhian – Seasonal Ranger

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Preface

Each year the peregrine chicks at the Falls of Clyde are ringed. This involves collecting the chicks from the nest and fitting them with a small metal ring on each …

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