Wildlife Blog 2nd September 2011

Good afternoon all,

Events from the nest:

As the season comes to a close there remains a good chance to see immature males that have not yet left on their migration to Africa. However, as we head into September the sightings will naturally decrease.

Other Wildlife at Loch of the Lowes:

Although the bird feeders at the viewing window have had to be removed this week (see earlier post) a high level of activity has remained. Great Spotted Woodpeckers, Treecreepers and Jays have all been sighted as well as the usual host of Chaffinches, Greenfinches, Siskins, Great tits, Coal tits and Blue tits. The Red squirrels have also remained regular visitors.

Similarly, the loch this week has seen its share regular visitors such as Mallards, Tufted ducks and Canada geese. In addition, a Water Rail has been seen this week. Also, the juvenile Great Crested grebes are still residing on the loch with Goosander and the occasional Cormorant. The Grey herons have also been quite active this week and their numbers have slightly increased.

As well as the resident bird life, Fallow deer with young have been regularly seen on the reserve this week.

Conservation work and sightings on the Perthshire reserves:

The conservation day at the Tummel Shingle Islands this week was a great success and the impact the removal of the Himalayan balsam has had on the reserve has received high praise from the returning volunteers. Consequently, the local flora appears to be more diverse than last year at this time. Meadow and Wood cranesbill, Rock rose and Ladies bedstraw can all be seen on the reserve at the moment. As well as a diverse range of flowering plants, several signs of the resident mammals were also seen such as indicators of both Badger and Otter activity.

During the week the Conservation team visited the wildflower meadow at Keltneyburn. As the seasons turn, this reserve alters its appearance greatly. During the mid-summer months, the numerous species of orchid on the reserve take pride of place among the species rich meadow. But from late summer into early autumn these give way to swathes of plants such as Devil’s bit scabious which has a vivid purple flower.

Another destination for the team was Balnaguard Glen. Continuation of the bracken control can be seen to be having a significant effect on the juniper bushes higher up the glen.

Perthshire Reserves Conservation Team

Preface

Good afternoon all, Events from the nest: As the season comes to a close there remains a good chance to see immature males that have not yet left on their …

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