Wildlife Blog 29th June 2011

Events from the nest

Our resident female was sitting tight on the three eggs this morning at 9.00 am, contact calling for her mate. She continued calling until 10.15 am by which time the male could be seen in a nearby pine. Leaving the nest unattended between 10.48 and 11.30, she then returned to tidy and settle again on the eggs.

Both birds are now spending more time away from the nest, but on each return they continue to turn and incubate the eggs; as mentioned in previous blog posts this behaviour is not uncommon and does give an interesting insight into the time scale the birds will keep trying to hatch their eggs.

This is new territory for our female as it is the first time since her arrival at Loch of the Lowes in 1991 that no chicks have been hatched; she has done so well for so long, rearing 48 chicks over her previous breeding seasons on the loch.

The male Osprey brought in a fish at 12.50 pm, the female then left the nest with the fish and the male chose a favourite perch to rest up. The eggs were left unattended for a much longer period with the female only returning at 3.20 pm. At 4.20pm the female began distress calling as another Osprey arrived and circled around the sitting bird, before eventually heading off in a westerly direction.

 

Other wildlife at Loch of the Lowes

From the viewing window today there was the usual array of chaffinch, blue tits, great tits and siskin, along with the greater spotted woodpecker, greenfinches and robins. The viewing area always provides an enjoyable look at woodland nature. One mallard duckling with parent was seen foraging for grain dropped from the feeders.

The red squirrels were also on show, commanding pride of place at the nut filled feeders.

On the water we had 46 Canada geese, a slightly higher number than usual; these birds will also use the surrounding water bodies to feed and roost so their numbers on the Lowes will fluctuate. Within the contingent of Canada geese were two Greylag geese who seem to be quite readily accepted by their larger family members.

Three great crested grebes were seen today as opposed to only one on the previous two days, there has been evidence of nesting behaviour so the other birds may well be sitting on nesting platforms within the emergent vegetation around the loch edge.

Douglas

Assistant Ranger

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Preface

Events from the nest Our resident female was sitting tight on the three eggs this morning at 9.00 am, contact calling for her mate. She continued calling until 10.15 am …

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