Wildlife Blog 22nd June 2011

Good afternoon all,

Events at the nest today:

At 10:25am, our male departed the nest leaving the eggs unattended, with the female returning at 10:38am to continue incubation. Then at 11:40am, the male brought in a clump of turf to add to the lining of the nest. The female then leaves the nest. At 11:56am, our male flies off the nest once again and leaves the eggs unattended. The female then returned at 11:58am and changes places with him.

Yet another changeover took place at 12:21pm, followed by another absence at 12:38pm when the male left once again. The female returned once more at 12:46pm and continues incubation of the eggs. The male makes a brief appearance at the nest at 12:50pm, then arrives back at 15:37pm. However, both birds fly off, leaving the nest once more unattended. The female then arrives back in at 15:45pm and continues to incubate the eggs.

For any more questions regarding our ospreys that you may have, please check our dedicated FAQ page and see if you can find the answer you are looking for:

http://www.swt.org.uk/wildlife/ospreys-at-lowes/frequently-asked-questions/

Other Wildlife at Loch of the Lowes:

Seen out on the loch today were; three greylag geese, thirty eight Canada geese, eighteen mallard, three mute swans, two oystercatchers, circa twenty sand martins, circa thirty swallows, two herring gulls, two pairs of great crested grebes a black headed gull and a goosander. Three curlews were also seen flying over the loch, calling as they went.

At the feeders, two adult great tits were seen along with five immature birds. Also present were; thirty plus chaffinches, as well as four blue tits, two coal tits, three greenfinches, two yellowhammers, a robin, five siskins, a jay and two red squirrels. On other parts of the reserve, two fallow deer and a roe deer were spotted.

Excitingly, a sparrow hawk was seen flying fast through past the viewing window, scattering the mass of smaller birds that were feeding there. These birds are regularly seen in the vicinity of the feeders due to the many prey birds which use them.

Simon

Perthshire Reserves Trainee Ranger

Preface

Good afternoon all, Events at the nest today: At 10:25am, our male departed the nest leaving the eggs unattended, with the female returning at 10:38am to continue incubation. Then at …

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