Wildlife Blog 16th June 2011

Events from the nest:

Throughout the course of the day so far, it has mainly been our male that we have seen on the nest incubating the three eggs that remain. 7Y, took over from our female at 9.15am and incubated for the next 2 ½ hours. The female then returned with the tail end of a fish and landed on the nest to incubate for a short period. By 12.30 the male returned and there was a changeover. The male has incubated since this time; with the female returning briefly at 12.50, but not settling on the nest to incubate. During the afternoon, out male has been turning the eggs regularly.

Other wildlife at Loch of the Lowes

The two pairs of great crested grebes have been demonstrating their courtship display today: rising out of the water and shaking their heads. This is something visitors to Loch of the Lowes really admire. The nests that have been built on the vegetation on the loch are fairly close together and there have been territorial disputes between the males. From the hides, the male great crested grebes could be seen attempting to make themselves appear as large as possible in order to intimidate their opponent. This dispute also involved a lot of diving and reappearing, with the grebes rising high out of the water, apparently again in an effort to seem larger and more threatening. However, when the conflict moved near to one of the nest, the male who had not built that nest backed down and returned to his mate. It will be interesting to wait and find out if both nests will remain in the same location, or whether one pair will find another spot.

Elsewhere on the loch were mute swans, greylag geese, goldeneye, mallard, tufted duck, and a large number of Canada geese: 47!

Around the reserve and on the feeders were collard doves, great spotted woodpeckers, blue tits, coal tits, great tits, goldfinches, greenfinches, yellowhammers, and red squirrels.

Anna

Perthshire Ranger

Preface

Events from the nest: Throughout the course of the day so far, it has mainly been our male that we have seen on the nest incubating the three eggs that …

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