Nature Notes

Have you ever looked around the Clydesdale countryside and thought how beautiful it is? The rolling hills, wide river valleys with lush meadows, deep tree clad gorges tumbling with waterfalls, it has it all.  Surely it is worth protecting and nurturing for future generations. Some would say there is no need to protect or conserve this beautiful land, it has always been like this, why wouldn’t continue? To that we must ask ourselves, where do we still have clear views of nature without roads, railways, houses, telegraph poles or wind generators?  When did you last see a red squirrel? Do water voles peek out of our river banks, or crossbills call among the trees? Scottish Wildlife Trust are actively working to protect Scotland’s wildlife for the future. Find out how you can support them by visiting the Falls of Clyde visitor centre.

Last November was the coldest for 20 years and it was the coldest December for a century – conditions which the British Bee-KeepingAssoc (BBKA) said favoured bees because they stay tightly clustered in their hives saving energy for the spring when they forage again.

Despite the cold, BBKA members reported that 13.6 per cent of hives in England died last winter and in some parts of the country the rates were even higher:  Clydesdale bee hives were severely hit.

Early flowering bulbs (snowdrops and crocus) provide a good start for the year before the summer flowering trees and plants and Ivy is a good source of autumn nectar. but there’s still time to buy seeds and provide essential food for winter.

Local Job Vacancy
There is a job vacancy with the Scottish Wildlife Trust at the Falls of Clyde visitor centre. For anyone interested, please view the job description and application form on line at www.swt.org.uk . The closing date is Monday July 4th 2011.

Sightings
Common spotted orchid, smooth hawks-beard, Oxeye Daisy, pink and cream foxgloves, buttercup, and the beautiful “gracefully tattered” Ragged Robin. As well as having many myths attached to it regarding the choosing of future romantic partners, the plant of this unusual looking wildflower contains saponis – a soap substitute. This can be extracted by boiling the roots in water and used for washing clothes and hair.

For further information on all wildlife issues, please contact the Scottish Wildlife Trust Falls of Clyde visitor centre, New Lanark 01555 665262 or email fallsofclyde@swt.org.uk.

Cherry – Visitor Centre Assistant

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Preface

Have you ever looked around the Clydesdale countryside and thought how beautiful it is? The rolling hills, wide river valleys with lush meadows, deep tree clad gorges tumbling with waterfalls, …

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