Wildlife Blog 8th May 2011

Good afternoon all,

Events at the nest today:

Although our osprey pair have braved a few passing showers, the weather has brightened up significantly today. So far today, our male has brought in two fish to the nest. The first, very large, whole fish arrived at 10:10am this morning. The second arrived at 12:59pm. This fish was just the tail end and had already been fed upon by the male.

In an unusual turn of events, a red squirrel was caught on the nest camera in a topmost branch of the nest tree at 16:55pm. This caused the male to get a bit flustered and he stood off the eggs, stretching out his wings in warning. The squirrel quickly got the message and moved on, allowing the male to continue his incubation duties comfortably.

A question we received via ospreys@swt.org.uk asked us if the male always brings in a headless fish or if they are sometimes brought in whole. From what we have seen, the male will usually eat the head of a fish he catches himself and then deliver the rest to the female for her to eat. However, he will occasionally bring in a whole fish. This will most likely depend on how hungry he is at the time of catching it.

Other Wildlife at Loch of the Lowes:

Out on the water, four great crested grebes were recorded, along with four mute swans, fifteen mallard, two tufted duck and a pair of goosander.

At the feeding station, three great spotted woodpeckers could be seen from the viewing window, along with three pheasant, three siskin, two yellowhammer, great tits, blue tits, coal tits, a reed bunting and a greenfinch. Around fifteen chaffinches were also seen throughout the day. The raucous call of jays was also heard.

From the areas of deciduous woodland which surround the loch could be heard the call of a wood warbler. This species, bearing a striking resemblance to the willow warbler, is a summer visitor to Britain from April to September, wintering in tropical regions of Africa. Often difficult to spot amongst the foliage, it is most easily recognised by its call which is said to sound similar to a coin spinning low on a marble surface.

Simon

SITA Species Protection Officer

Preface

Good afternoon all, Events at the nest today: Although our osprey pair have braved a few passing showers, the weather has brightened up significantly today. So far today, our male …

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