Wildlife Blog 10th May 2011

Events from the nest today:

On the nest today, we have seen incubation duties continuing through the rain showers. After the blog was posted yesterday, our male impressively delivered two very large fish to the nest, taking the day’s total up to 4! The final fish (a headless trout), delivered at 5.21pm was taken by our female, leaving her mate to incubate the eggs for over 3 hours!! Finally, at 8.33pm, our female returned with part of the fish which our male then flew off with.

We recently received a few inquiries via ospreys@swt.org.uk into when they eggs are likely to hatch. As our female osprey is estimated to be an astonishing 26 years of age, we will not know whether the eggs are fertile until the time of hatching. The incubation period for ospreys is 37 days on average, but this can take from 35 to 39 days. As the first egg was laid on the 13th April, we can reasonably expect any viable eggs to hatch on or around the 20th May. Last year, the first egg was laid on the 13th April and the first hatching date was 21st May.

Other wildlife at Loch of the Lowes:

During osprey watch last night, one of our SITA Species Protection Officers reported seeing an emperor moth. This moth is reasonably common with both species active during April and May and the male having bright orange hind wings, while females are greyer in colour. It was a female that was seen here at Loch of the Lowes at approximately 11pm.

Out on the loch, 4 great crested grebes were seen, along with 3 mute swans, 5 Canada geese and several mallards. There are now at least 2 sets of duckings – one duck was seen with 9 ducklings, while another had 11. Today there have also been sightings of curlew, oystercatchers, swallows an swifts.

Meanwhile, at the feeders were 2 great spotted woodpeckers, one robin, 3 blue tits, a coal tit, 3 great tits, 11 chaffinches, a greenfinch, 2 siskins, a yellowhammer and two bank voles; while the calls of a green woodpecker, a wood pigeon and cuckoos could be heard.

Anna

Perthshire Reserves Seasonal Ranger

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Preface

Events from the nest today: On the nest today, we have seen incubation duties continuing through the rain showers. After the blog was posted yesterday, our male impressively delivered two …

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