Wildlife Blog 26th May 2011

Events from the nest today:

It is now 43 days after the first egg was laid and 40 days after the second. We remain hopeful here at Loch of the Lowes that we may have chicks at some point. Our female often surprises us. Reaching an estimated 26 years of age alone is astonishing – meaning she has clocked up around 120,000 miles making the annual migration to West Africa. Last year, following a bout of illness, it seemed that our female’s chances of making the migration were low as her condition was compromised due to the mystery illness which left her unable to eat for several days.  On the 28th March staff and followers on the webcam were all thrilled to see the return of this very special bird, who had surprised us all with her determination to make the migration.

This morning at 6.36am our male osprey, 7Y, arrived at the nest with a fish for his mate. Our female then accepted the delivery and flew off to eat it elsewhere. Both ospreys are continuing with incubation duties – periodically rolling eggs and changing over duties.

The 24 hour Watch continues here at Loch of the Lowes – ensuring the security of the three eggs on the nest. We will keep you all updated as any events unfold.

We have received queries via ospreys@swt.org.uk regarding the satellite tracking programme. Full details of this can be found on our dedicated webpage; so for answers to any of your questions, follow this link:

http://www.swt.org.uk/wildlife/ospreys-at-lowes/osprey-tracking/

For any more questions regarding our ospreys that you may have, please check our dedicated FAQ page and see if you can find the answer you are looking for:

http://www.swt.org.uk/wildlife/ospreys-at-lowes/frequently-asked-questions/

Other wildlife at Loch of the Lowes:

Out on the loch today were a pair of great crested grebes, mute swans, mallards and tufted ducks. Flying overhead were sand martins, swallows, swifts and four common terns.

At the feeding windows were great spotted woodpeckers, robins, a willow warbler, blue tits, coal tits, great tits, chaffinches, greenfinches, siskins and a yellowhammer. A cuckoo and a wood warbler were also heard today.

Anna

Perthshire Reserves Seasonal Ranger

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Events from the nest today: It is now 43 days after the first egg was laid and 40 days after the second. We remain hopeful here at Loch of the …

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