Osprey Diary August 28, 2010

A grand morning at the Loch! Crisp, calm and clear.

Last night I was gazing north over the Tay valley, rolling wheat  beneath my feet, tall deciduous trees along the wide river banks, and up to a few, as they are called in the Western Isles, “papps”, Beinn Mhor and others at more than 1000 metres/ 3300 feet. Above, were determined swallows in a large continuous flock heading directly south aerial foraging as they went. I use the words “determined” and “directly” with intent; as I intend to underscore the drive of migrants, their ability to pool their resources and skills to one end/destination/goal. 

There are salmon thrashing up the rocky gorge of the Braan just west of Dunkeld these days. A drive far stronger than the downward thrust of the cold water and gashes of stone on scale.

And so, ospreys move from this large island. As some of you know we witnessed the presence of an osprey for about two hours on Thursday afternoon on the Loch. Surely a “she” popping in to a no doubt known (to her) territory of a prime osprey nesting site. Perhaps this bird knew that if an osprey nest was nearby, fish supply and security was guaranteed… Yesterday morning too, I saw an osprey fly through the area from the crannog hide, moving south. 

One of “our” blog people posts recent U.K. osprey sightings. I encourage you to scroll back to yesterday for an update. Good stuff.

These are determined times; flights of birds overhead, mass feeding sites, along shore, woods and water. The magic of life surrounds. We too are driven. I hope that we “know” why.

The best of wishes for all migrants, including human ones today. Rinchen

Preface

A grand morning at the Loch! Crisp, calm and clear. Last night I was gazing north over the Tay valley, rolling wheat  beneath my feet, tall deciduous trees along the …

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